Wayne’s Main Intersection


The house which stood for over fifty years on the Northwest corner was constructed around 1883. Since Lancaster Avenue was narrower then, there was room for a lawn and picket fence. When J. Henry Askin moved out of Louella, he lived here until relocating to Florida in the 1880s. It was bought by Lizzie Pugh Fronefield from Christopher and Emma Fallon. At this time the building was a residence with a post office on the side facing N. Wayne Ave. The post office moved out around 1900, and the residence was divided into two stores, one facing Wayne Ave, the other on the corner. Mr. Wemmer operated the “Wayne Mart” on the corner until Mr. Stafford took over in 1910. An addition was made to the rear in about 1905, and Louis de Louis’s tailor shop moved in. David H. Henderson opened a fish market there a decade later. It was taken over by Earl Frankenfeld around 1947. The corner store was home to a variety store operated by William A. Miller and his wife. The store became known as “Miller’s Store,” and its large signs advertised “Breyers Ice Cream  Stationery  Candy  |  Candy & Toys  Coca-Cola  Novelties.” Mrs. Miller died in early 1949, and electrical appliance / floor coverings store Cobb & Lawless took over the space. Cobb & Lawless already operated in the store to the left, in the same building, and reopened with both storefronts later in 1949. They painted all the brickwork white and remodeled the building so that the first floor was at ground level. In 1951 the house caught fire, and Cobb & Lawless were forced to build a new building on the corner. The new structure was just one story tall, and featured many large display windows. Wayne Jewelers and Silversmiths, who had operated for a few years in the Anthony Wayne Theatre building, moved to this location after Cobb & Lawless moved out.



The house in 1919, before it was completely commercial.
From “Radnor: A Pictorial History”A truck at the corner in front of the building. It is unsure what function this truck had.
Radnor Historical Society Collection

Miller’s Store, 1948.
From “Radnor: A Pictorial History”

 

The building in 1949, when Miller’s Store just moved out and Cobb & Lawless was ready to expand.
Radnor Historical Society Collection

The fire which gutted Cobb & Lawless in 1951. After this they were forced to rebuild.
Radnor Historical Society Collection

 

Cobb & Lawless’s new building.
Radnor Historical Society Collection

 

Here’s what the corner would look like today if the original house were still there.
GP Graphic


 

The Wayne Title & Trust Co. was founded in 1890 by local businessmen. They had their building designed by William L. Price and constructed on the Southwest corner in the same year. It was enlarged very soon after. The building is notable for housing many important local establishments, like the office of builder J.D. Lengel. It was also the first home of the Radnor Township Commissioners. They met in the Title & Trust building from 1901 to 1928. In 1930 a whole new Title & Trust Co. building was built, with huge columns and an overall square design. It still stands on the corner. The Company was bought by the First Pennsylvania Banking and Trust Co. on March 16, 1956. It operated as a bank until the late 1990s, when the building was taken over by U.S. Trust.


The original stone building before enlargements.
Radnor Historical Society Collection

 

The enlarged building.
From “Radnor: A Pictorial History”


 

The building on the Southeast corner was commercial from the very beginning. It was built about 1884, and at that time pharmacist J.M. Fronefield moved there from the Opera House. Fronefield was postmaster of the General Wayne post office, which operated in this building starting 1885. Harry LaDow bought the drugstore in 1910. The left half of the building was occupied by Lienhardt’s Bakery, which took over Stritzinger’s Bakery in 1887. Lienhardt’s became famous locally for baked goods, ice cream and much more. The Lienhardt family ran the bakery for 63 years. In 1927 the building was split right in half, and only the left part remained standing. The right half was replaced by a large brick building, which first contained the drug store. The two top floors contained substantial space for offices. The store once home to Lienhardt’s became Harry’s, then Pie in the Sky Pizza. The bottom floor contained a number of stores including most recently the Gap, Robertson’s Seedlings and Robertson’s Flowers.


The newly built storefront, with J.M. Fronefield as the only tenant. Circa 1884.
From “Radnor: A Pictorial History”

 

A horse and carriage at the corner in the 1880s.
Radnor Historical Society Collection

The interior of the Lienhardt Bakery, 1890′s. It can be assumed that the patrons actually did have faces.
Click on the image to see a larger version.
From “Historic Wayne”


A vintage advertisement for the Bakery.
Click on the image to see a larger version.
From “Radnor: A Pictorial History”


The corner circa 1890. The steps lead to the post office.
From “Historic Wayne”

The building around 1927, before the right half was demolished.
From “Historic Wayne”



The new building at the corner, 1928.
From “Historic Wayne”

 

The store “Buttercup” occupying the far left store in the 1970s.
Radnor Historical Society Collection